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Having Nerve Pain On Right Side Of Face,

Having Nerve Pain On Right Side Of Face,

It’s like Shingles but it’s not; jaw hurting, sharp nerve flares on right temple? On Gabapentin.

A MyMSTeam Member said:

I hope this helps.
MSF 27 MS and Trigeminal neuralgia (TN)
What Causes Trigeminal Neuralgia?
The pain associated with trigeminal neuralgia represents an irritation of the nerve. The cause of the pain usually is due to contact between a healthy artery or vein and the trigeminal nerve at the base of the brain. This places pressure on the nerve as it enters the brain and causes the nerve to misfire.
Other causes of trigeminal neuralgia include pressure of a tumor on the nerve or multiple sclerosis, which damages the myelin sheaths that insulate and help conduct electrical impulses across nerve cells. Development of trigeminal neuralgia in a young adult suggests the possibility of multiple sclerosis.
Secondary Symptomatic Trigeminal Neuralgia (STN): Pain resulting from multiple sclerosis.
The pain is often described as an excruciating sensation, similar to an electric shock. The attacks can be so severe that you are unable to do anything during them, and the pain can sometimes bring you to your knees.
Trigeminal neuralgia usually only affects one side of your face. In rare cases it can affect both sides, although not at the same time. The pain can be in the teeth, the lower jaw, upper jaw, cheek and, less commonly, in the forehead or the eye.
You may feel aware of an impending attack of pain, though these usually come unexpectedly.
After the main, severe pain has subsided, you may experience a slight ache or burning feeling. There may also be a constant throbbing, aching or burning sensation between attacks.
You may have episodes of pain lasting regularly for days, weeks or months at a time. It is possible for the pain to then disappear completely and not recur for several months or years (a period known as “remission”). However, in severe cases, attacks may occur hundreds of times a day, and there may be no periods of remission.
Symptom triggers
Attacks of trigeminal neuralgia can be triggered by certain actions or movements, such as:
• talking
• smiling
• chewing
• brushing your teeth
• washing your face
• a light touch
• shaving or putting on make-up
• swallowing
• kissing
• a cool breeze or air conditioning
• head movements
• vibrations, such as walking or a car journey
Treatment with Medications:
Anticonvulsant medications, which slow down the nerve’s conduction of pain signals, are usually the first treatment option.
These include:
Tegretol, Trileptal, Carbatrol, Dilantin, Lamictal, Keppra, Topamax, Neurontin, Klonopin and Lyrica
• Anticonvulsants
• Carbamazepine (Tegretol)
• Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal)
• Gabapentin (Neurontin)
• Phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek)
• Topiramate (Topamax)
• Lamotrigine (Lamictal, Lamictal ODT, Lamictal XR)
• Pregabalin (Lyrica)
• Baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen)
• Antidepressants
• Amitriptyline
Tegretol (carbamazepine) is the primary drug used to treat TN. Many physicians believe that the relief of facial pain with Tegretol confirms the

posted over 3 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

Believe me you don't want it !

posted over 3 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

Gabapentin and Norco help, but that sharp pain to the head is relentless.

posted over 3 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

Well @A MyMSTeam Member... looks like you nailed it right on the head. Pun intended. I will contact my Neuro. Thanks so much!

posted over 3 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

Thanks

posted over 3 years ago
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