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Real members of MyMSTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

Is Anyone Doing Physical And Occupational Therapy, And If You Are, What's The Pros And Cons?

Is Anyone Doing Physical And Occupational Therapy, And If You Are, What's The Pros And Cons?

posted over 8 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

You have a healthy and respectful view on PT and OT. My wife loves massages for her well-being always encouraging me to partake of the manipulation. Maybe I have not discovered the "right" technique but massages do little for me. I do find the environment very nice and quiet allowing me to enjoy luminous drift - for a while. Oh well, anything helps.
-sevensix

posted over 8 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

I agree that PTs that specialize in neuro are very good, but I also want to stress the importance of OTs. I just finished 12 weeks of OT for my hands, and the difference has been incredible. My last relapse caused huge problems with my hands (among other things) and I was not able to type for even 10 minutes before my fingers would curl up into fists and not be able to do anything. I wasn't able to hold things, even to try to eat was difficult because I couldn't hold the utensils. But now, I am not dropping things as much. I can write legibly for a short period, I can type for about half an hour, and I am much more coordinated. I am now seeing the OT for 6 weeks to try to correct the problems in my shoulder caused by having to carry so much weight through my arms (with a walker or cane). I have developed tendonitis and spasticity in the muscles in my upper back, neck and shoulder, so the OT is working with me on stretching and strengthening so that everything is working together as best it can. This is helping with pain and function, and the OT is very good at suggesting that I ask my neuro about specific things that she sees that could benefit from some other modality - like medication or massage, etc. So hats off to both PTs and OTs!

posted over 8 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

I should add to my previous post PT for me is general exercise and stretching in gentle sessions that avoid any torsion of the spine. Lhermittes don't need much encouragement to set them off. PT emphasizes short sessions with modest resistive effort, rest breaks, gentle excursions into repetitions. A PT specializing in neuro is to your benefit because they should know you are not going to get better except for the benefits of exercise and cardio we should all do regularily. Flexibility is the name of the game so you can be comfortable most of the time. They are the unspoken heroes of medicine.
-sevensix

posted over 8 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

I took both-OT and PT, I just wish I could have them more often, (the hospital is far from me, my husband is only off from work every other Monday. I am on the waiting list for transportation from the MS society.) As soon as I can get transportation I wanna take them at least twice a week. The PT is like exercise and the OT is good because it helps to strengthen your muscles. I also wanna take water aerobics even though I am afraid of deep water.

posted over 8 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

Physical therapist seem to well rounded in all health topics generally apart from medicine per se. They work you continuously and make sure get better through healthy life styles.

posted over 8 years ago
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