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Real members of MyMSTeam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

Seeking Advice For Regaining An Ability Damaged By A Relapse.

Seeking Advice For Regaining An Ability Damaged By A Relapse.

After a relapse that the entire right side of my body went numb for three months I lost my ability to write, at least legibly. I’m not sure, after years of thinking it’d get better, what kind of doctor or therapist I should seek to help. Any advice given would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!!!!

posted July 9
A MyMSTeam Member

I agree with the PT/OT recommendations, but I have a different thing for you to consider. It starts with a question and it is what DMD are you taking? I know I lost my right and more dominant side right before my initial diagnosis with MS. Though I wouldn't recommend this, I was so freaked I learned to write left handed. My right side did return a bit until my sight went double for like 3 months. I couldn't learn to see with anything else, right, so, based on my doctor's recommendation, I switched DMDs. Within a short time after taking the new med, many of my extreme symptoms subsided. While it's good advice to seek OT and PT for your issues, it may make sense to try something different

posted July 11
A MyMSTeam Member

I’ve found various YouTube videos for other things… many PT videos! It might be there or you possibly could write one and request a special video tailored to your need! Plz keep us updated!!! Hugs!

posted July 9
A MyMSTeam Member

PT or OT would be the specialist you'd want to talk to.

But you can bounce back and do miraculous things. A story, if you don't mind: I lost the use of my left hand for about 10-15 years. It was numb, barely moved and I could stick pins into it and couldn't feel them -- it was useless.

I did things all wrong. I didn't use PT or OT, no doctors involved -- stupid stuff. Since I'm right handed it was easy to hide my left. So I ignored it.

But after all that time I then had an MS flare/attack and my hand felt "different." So I started stretching and working things. Within a month or more I had the hand so I could snap fingers and do the finger-thumb test neurologists love to do. It was far from "normal" but it was vastly improved.

Who knows how your situation will turn out. But exercising PT and OT options you may be pleasantly surprised. The "worst" that'll happen is that you'll be taking charge and trying to do something. And there are few downsides in that!

posted July 9 (edited)
A MyMSTeam Member

Hi!

I think an Occupational Therapist would be your best bet. My daughter is in grad school for it, and helps patients with holding pencils, forks, etc. Best of luck!

posted July 9
A MyMSTeam Member

I would agree. An OT has special education to address adaptive techniques to assist fine motor function.

posted July 9

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