Brain fog & prefrontal cortex lesions

Brain fog & prefrontal cortex lesions

I wondered if some of the lesions are in fact trauma as well as MS, most of mine developed in the last 5-6 years of having an awful lot of stress over a couple of year period. I have lesions in the prefrontal cortex & find I'm down about not staying focused long enough or concentrate or on task, from one thing to another. My intentions are always good, heart in the right place, just so forgetful. If I learn to use something (new tool), I find the next day I can't… read more

A MyMSTeam Member said:

I understand to-days meds are very helpful. But in the late sixties and early seventies when I got a major attack. It was Prednisone stopped that. A list as long as my arm suggested help and cure. Take you pick: Bee stings, Tank depression and many more.

Because of my very fit condition I was back on my feet sooner than doctors expected. Keep fit and eat nutritious food has been my mantra. Never used anything more than Panadol to settle the spasms.
Swimming is the go: you feel light-er, no balance worries, movements are smooth and not strained.
How far do I swim? As far as I can.

posted over 1 year ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

A lot of people say that stress makes their MS worse. I have some problems similar to yours. I am so disorganized. I have a hard time finding almost anything. I pay at least a few bills late every month. Generic namenda seemed to help me with concentration at first. Maybe low dose naltrexone did, too. Sometimes I notice a difference when I run out of these. That's another thing. I usually run out of my medicine and don't get my refills in time. I had neuropsychological testing twice. I was glad there wasn't any change the second time. I was told that my visual recall is very poor. I guess that explains why I have trouble finding stuff and I can't remember where I put stuff! I have really good auditory recall so maybe that compensates. I should just talk to myself and tell myself where I put something!! I found out I lost 23 IQ points! I cried and felt bad about that. Then the next day I decided to get over that. One of my doctors said I would have scored about the same as my original IQ if I would have had more time. That makes sense since our processing time can be slower with MS. I'm definitely an overthinker. I obsess a lot. I'm really interested in neuroscience, too. I told my husband this is the best disease I could have. MS is just so mysterious and so interesting. Very fascinating. I love reading all about this strange disease.

posted almost 2 years ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

I took baclavin to alleviate spasms. When that drug was ineffective I quit and realized the side effects- like draining the body of energy. I swim every day for half an hour. and another 15 min. moving vigorously to get the lungs and heart pumping. Exercise has kept me since my MS diagnosis in 1970.

posted over 1 year ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

Yeah, that's what my neurologost called it when I was totally losing my faculties, getting lost in the most familiar places, couldn't take care of my kids, couldn't understand instructions from my boss ... Brain fog - a symptom of MS. Back then information on drug interactions and side effects was not readily available on the Internet. I called the makers of all the drugs my neuro had put me on, and bought a large, expensive book about prescription drugs. It took me longer than it should have to figure out that I was on some real mind-bending drugs - antidepressants, anti-seizure, anti-spasm, and several others. I was a zombie. I went off all the drugs and got my mind back. I lost 2 years of my life and lost my job thanks to brain fog, only is was not caused by MS at all. I'd recommend everyone take a good look at the prescriptions you're on before you blame your brain fog on MS.

posted over 1 year ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

I’ve had most of your MS fog symptoms. I was an RN, and was super-organized and a great multi-tanker. I finally was so depressed over these symptoms that my neurologist referred me to a neuropsychiatrist. I lost my career. A group of meds, and adjusting doses, has helped. I was always the bill manager at home, but, now, my husband has taken over the bills because I was over-looking things. It’s really tough to give up some of your independence, but sometimes you just HAVE to ask for help, and then it’s gladly given.

posted 12 months ago
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