Seizures

Seizures

I was able to get in to the Neurologist N.P. yesterday. I was going through the symptom tracker with him. When I told him about the headches (with this cold flushed water feeling, under my skull), then the spasms on my right arm, and behind my right eye, the insomnia with a vengeance, he had a few questions.

He said he wanted to do an extended E.E.G, to check my brain waves, and he wanted to rule out for sure that I wasn't having small seizures of sorts. Has anyone else had something close to seizures… read more

A MyMSTeam Member said:

Well that reads as usual all they can do is clutch at straws instead of asking us who are going threw all this mess. There is a lot of rubbish out there even in the profession people so they should even ask to get the right problems.

posted 3 months ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

Thank you @ RuddyFool! The information was very helpful. I don't have a history of epilepsy or seizures. I'm anxious to see what the E.E.G, and other tests that I was to take next month uncovers. I'll post afterwards.

posted 3 months ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

MSF 20 Seizures
I hope this helps.
Seizures, which are the result of abnormal electrical discharges in an injured or scarred area of the brain, are fairly uncommon in MS. Their incidence has been estimated at 2-5 percent, compared to the estimated 3 percent incidence of seizures in the general population. The reason seizures are more common in people with MS is not completely understood. Seizures are classified into two forms-generalized and focal.

If you are experiencing new symptoms that you think could be seizure activity you need to contact your healthcare provider immediately or go to an emergency room for medical care.

To learn more about the different types of seizures, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Treating seizures
Seizures are usually diagnosed by the clinical history and an electroencephalogram (EEG), which is a recording of electrical activity in the brain. Most seizure disorders can be well controlled by use of the appropriate anticonvulsant medication and continuing medical supervision.

posted 3 months ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

MSF 20 Seizures
I hope this helps.
Seizures, which are the result of abnormal electrical discharges in an injured or scarred area of the brain, are fairly uncommon in MS. Their incidence has been estimated at 2-5 percent, compared to the estimated 3 percent incidence of seizures in the general population. The reason seizures are more common in people with MS is not completely understood. Seizures are classified into two forms-generalized and focal.

If you are experiencing new symptoms that you think could be seizure activity you need to contact your healthcare provider immediately or go to an emergency room for medical care.

To learn more about the different types of seizures, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Treating seizures
Seizures are usually diagnosed by the clinical history and an electroencephalogram (EEG), which is a recording of electrical activity in the brain. Most seizure disorders can be well controlled by use of the appropriate anticonvulsant medication and continuing medical supervision.

posted about 1 month ago
A MyMSTeam Member said:

The first I landed on the floor it was at night, this was 13 years ago, now I take med's for it. You will do fine I had 3 I am going to have 4 next week. To see where I am at.

posted 3 months ago
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