Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
About MyMSTeam

MS Fatigue: How To Fight Fatigue with MS

Updated on January 04, 2021
Medically reviewed by
Alissa Willis, M.D.
Article written by
Kelly Crumrin

Fatigue is a very common symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS) and can be a disabling and frustrating symptom with a huge impact on quality of life. Between 75 percent and 95 percent of people with MS experience fatigue.

How Is MS Fatigue Different From Normal Fatigue?

Fatigue in MS is different in many ways from the tiredness people may experience as the result of a long day at work or a late night out. Fatigue is also different from sleepiness, although staying in bed may be the only thing that seems to help at times. According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, people with MS commonly experience fatigue that persists daily, even after plenty of sleep, and worsens as the day goes on.

When fatigue affects people with MS in these ways, it may also be referred to as lassitude. MS fatigue is typically more severe than normal fatigue, and may interfere with work, school, and tasks of daily life. In fact, MS fatigue is a primary reason people with MS have to reduce work hours or stop working altogether.

What Does MS Fatigue Feel Like?

Members of MyMSTeam describe chronic, profound fatigue that does not usually improve with a nap or a cup of coffee. Here are some descriptions of MS fatigue from members in their own words:

  • “My body just shuts down.”
  • “Utter weariness.”
  • “Everything just feels slow.”
  • “Like taking three sleeping pills and still trying to function normally.”
  • “My brain and body just stop working.”
  • “I'll crawl at times, sit on the floor, then I can get up and take a few more steps.”
  • “Bone-crushing fatigue.”
  • “Fatigue is a never-ending battle.”

MyMSTeam members also discuss how MS fatigue affects their relationships with friends, family, and romantic partners. Members describe disappointment and resentment from loved ones who do not understand how severe and unrelenting their fatigue from multiple sclerosis can be.

What Causes Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis?

Researchers are not yet certain what causes fatigue in people with MS, but a recent review of research indicates that inflammation, other immune system processes, and lesions in the grey matter of the brain all likely play a role in MS fatigue. In multiple sclerosis, myelin (insulation that protects nerves) is damaged, causing disruptions to connections in the central nervous system (the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerve). As a result, in someone with MS, it takes more effort for the brain to relay messages and coordinate movement. All of these factors are believed to play a role in MS fatigue.

Of course, people with multiple sclerosis can also experience fatigue from other causes. For instance, fatigue can be a side effect of some medications. When the body is fighting an infection, fatigue is often a consequence. About half of people with MS experience depression at some point, and depression can worsen MS fatigue as well as directly cause fatigue. Other MS symptoms, including leg weakness and muscle weakness, can add to the burden of MS fatigue.

Ways To Fight MS Fatigue

Some people with MS are able to improve their MS fatigue by using medications or other approaches, such as increasing exercise or using energy-conserving techniques.

Medications To Treat MS Fatigue

There are several types of medications that are sometimes prescribed to help manage fatigue in people with multiple sclerosis. Members of MyMSTeam report varying degrees of effectiveness. Like all medications, drugs prescribed for MS fatigue can also cause side effects.

More than 2,400 members of MyMSTeam indicate that they have taken Symmetrel (Amantadine). Amantadine is used to treat influenza and Parkinson’s disease, and researchers are unsure how it works to manage MS fatigue. Provigil (Modafinil) is a wakefulness-promoting drug often prescribed for those with narcolepsy. Nuvigil (Armodafinil) is a very similar medication that is usually taken once a day.

Stimulants like Adderall (Amphetamine/Dextroamphetamine), Ritalin (Methylphenidate), and Concerta (Methylphenidate) can also be used to treat MS fatigue — although there is not good evidence that these work long-term.

Other Approaches To Managing Fatigue in MS

Exercise can have many benefits for people with MS. It may include improving fatigue as well as strength, flexibility, balance, cognition, mood, and bladder function. Tai chi, yoga, and water-based exercises are among the types of physical activity suggested for people with MS. Always talk to your doctor before beginning a new exercise regimen.

Some people with MS find that fatigue worsens with heat. Keeping cool as much as possible may help with MS fatigue. Some people with MS find cooling equipment such as scarves, fans, and vests to be helpful. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America offers a program to distribute cooling equipment to people with MS for free.

Some members of MyMSTeam report worse fatigue when they smoke cigarettes. According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, smoking can also affect the way MS medications work and hasten the progression from a relapsing to progressive type of MS.

Some MyMSTeam members say they feel better when they take nutritional supplements, such as vitamins or herbal products. Before adding any new supplement to your diet, talk to your doctor first. Some supplements can cause dangerous interactions with medications.

Many people with MS fatigue learn to use energy-conserving techniques. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America recommends energy-saving tactics including:

  • Scheduling tasks for the time of day with the highest energy level
  • Breaking tasks into smaller subtasks and taking them one at a time
  • Planning ahead to have supplies ready in place when needed for tasks

You Are Not Alone With MS Fatigue

On MyMSTeam, the social network and online support group for those living with multiple sclerosis, members talk about a range of personal experiences. Coping with MS fatigue is one of the most popular topics.

Is a daily struggle with fatigue part of your life with MS? How do you manage your MS fatigue? Share your experiences with fatigue in the comments below or by posting on MyMSTeam.

References

  1. Multiple Sclerosis: Fatigue — Cleveland Clinic
  2. Fatigue — National Multiple Sclerosis Society
  3. Pathophysiological and cognitive mechanisms of fatigue in multiple sclerosis — BMJ Journals
  4. Myelin — MedlinePlus
  5. Fatigue — Multiple Sclerosis Trust
  6. 5 Myths About Multiple Sclerosis and Depression — Johns Hopkins Medicine
  7. Fatigue — Multiple Sclerosis Association of America
  8. Benefits of an Exercise Program — National Multiple Sclerosis Society
  9. Cooling Products — Multiple Sclerosis Association of America
Alissa Willis, M.D. is chair of the department of neurology at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Learn more about her here.
Kelly Crumrin leads the creation of content that educates and empowers people with chronic illnesses. Learn more about her here.

A MyMSTeam Member said:

My fatigue is so bad. I have very little energy. I live in a one bedroom apartment and it's so hard for me to clean it or cook. I am very thankful for the support of my husband.

posted 14 days ago

hug (9)

Recent articles

The path to a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) can be long and uncertain. There is no single,...

The Role of MRI in Multiple Sclerosis Diagnosis

The path to a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) can be long and uncertain. There is no single,...
If your health insurance company ever denies payment for treatments, services, or equipment...

Health Insurance Appeals for Multiple Sclerosis

If your health insurance company ever denies payment for treatments, services, or equipment...
If you are living with multiple sclerosis (MS), you may find that the condition’s impact on your...

Workplace Accommodations for People With MS

If you are living with multiple sclerosis (MS), you may find that the condition’s impact on your...
If you have multiple sclerosis (MS), you may find it difficult to talk about problems with...

Intimacy and Multiple Sclerosis

If you have multiple sclerosis (MS), you may find it difficult to talk about problems with...
Having a chronic illness like multiple sclerosis (MS) means facing the premise that your life may...

Building Spirituality Into Your Life With MS

Having a chronic illness like multiple sclerosis (MS) means facing the premise that your life may...
Have you attended any of the MyMSTeam online socials yet? If not, no worries! MyMSTeam will be...

MyMSTeam Online Socials

Have you attended any of the MyMSTeam online socials yet? If not, no worries! MyMSTeam will be...
Multiple sclerosis (MS) may cause altered sensations on the skin. Although rare, some people with...

Multiple Sclerosis Itching: Causes and Treatments

Multiple sclerosis (MS) may cause altered sensations on the skin. Although rare, some people with...
As part of your MS care, you may have to follow up with many different members of a health care...

Making the Most Out of Your Provider Visits for Multiple Sclerosis

As part of your MS care, you may have to follow up with many different members of a health care...
Medicare is the federally sponsored health insurance plan in the United States that covers adults...

Medicare for Multiple Sclerosis: An Overview

Medicare is the federally sponsored health insurance plan in the United States that covers adults...
Navigating multiple sclerosis (MS) with your family can be a challenge. The condition may be...

Navigating Multiple Sclerosis With Your Family

Navigating multiple sclerosis (MS) with your family can be a challenge. The condition may be...
MyMSTeam My multiple sclerosis Team

Two Ways to Get Started with MyMSTeam

Become a Member

Connect with others who are living with multiple sclerosis. Get members only access to emotional support, advice, treatment insights, and more.

sign up

Become a Subscriber

Get the latest articles about multiple sclerosis sent to your inbox.

Not now, thanks

Privacy policy
MyMSTeam My multiple sclerosis Team

Thank you for signing up.

close