Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
Resources
About MyMSTeam

The Marburg Variant: Understanding Fulminant MS

Posted on June 29, 2021
Medically reviewed by
Remi A. Kessler, M.D.
Article written by
Jessica Wolpert

Marburg variant multiple sclerosis (MS) is a rare variation of MS. The condition is also called the Marburg course of MS, acute MS, malignant MS, and fulminant MS. The term “fulminant” means “severe and sudden in onset.”

What Is Marburg Variant MS?

All forms of MS involve demyelination — the destruction of the myelin sheath that surrounds and protects the nerves. Demyelination occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks the central nervous system (CNS), which primarily comprises the brain and spinal cord. This demyelination causes inflammation and damage to the nerve tissue. The damage and ultimate scarring — which forms into lesions — impairs the nervous system’s ability to communicate messages from the brain to other parts of the body. This can lead to symptoms and signs typically associated with MS, including:

  • Numbness
  • Weakness
  • Vision problems
  • Bowel and bladder dysfunction

There are several different subtypes of MS. Most people with MS have relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), in which they experience symptoms for a few weeks or months, then undergo periods of remission. Over time (usually decades), RRMS can develop into secondary progressive MS (SPMS), in which the disease continually worsens without remission. Some people are first diagnosed with primary progressive MS (PPMS), in which symptoms continue to worsen without remissions.

Whether you have RRMS, SPMS, or PRMS, the demyelination process is slow, meaning that the disease course can take years to progress. Although living with these types of MS can be difficult, they are almost never fatal in and of themselves.

However, in the Marburg type of MS, the demyelination process occurs much more quickly, and the demyelinating lesions are more widespread. People with Marburg variant MS experience startling, quick-onset symptoms, such as:

  • Severe confusion
  • Seizures
  • Quadriplegia (the inability to move one’s arms and legs)
  • Motor aphasia (the inability to talk)

The quick onset of symptoms is then typically followed by more relapses and rapid decline in neurological function.

Causes and Risk Factors of Marburg MS

As with other types of MS, the cause of Marburg variant MS cannot be pinpointed to one single factor. The current leading theory is, Marburg variant MS is an autoimmune disease, and a combination of genetic and environmental factors make certain individuals more susceptible to the condition. In addition, Marburg variant MS more commonly affects young adults and children, compared to other forms of MS.

Whereas the disease course of most types of MS is long-term, with disability that accumulates over time, Marburg variant MS is different. It typically has a very rapid and significant decline, often leading to death. Those who survive can develop severe residual disability.

Diagnosis of Marburg MS

Marburg variant MS is very rare, and even most neurologists will probably never see a case over the course of their career. As of 2015, only 17 case reports have been published about the disease since it was first discovered in 1906. In fact, diagnosing the condition can be difficult, simply because it is so uncommon and can be similar to other very rare conditions that cause demyelination. Conditions similar to Marburg variant MS include:

  • Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis
  • Balo's disease
  • Tumefactive MS

As such, it can be difficult for a doctor to determine whether a person’s signs and symptoms are caused by Marburg variant MS or another condition. Even with MRI scans, Marburg variant MS can appear similar to more common serious illnesses, such as tumors or infections.

With that said, diagnosis for any neurologic condition begins with a physical examination. Your doctor may order different tests, such as:

  • An MRI to visualize lesion enhancement
  • A spinal tap (lumbar puncture) to examine cerebrospinal fluid
  • Nerve function tests
  • Various blood tests to figure out the diagnosis

If standard testing fails to yield a clear diagnosis, or if your health care team wants to understand how much demyelination has occurred, a neurosurgeon might perform a brain biopsy. This process entails removing a small piece of brain tissue in an operating room. This piece of tissue is then examined under a microscope.

Treatment for Marburg MS

Treatment for Marburg variant MS must be aggressive and is done in a hospital environment. Options include:

  • High-dose corticosteroids
  • Plasma exchange (plasmapheresis)
  • Immunoglobulin therapy
  • Interferon-beta medications (immunomodulators)
  • Chemotherapy

These treatments have had varying levels of success in clinical settings.

Prognosis and Outlook for Marburg MS

Most people with MS generally have slightly shorter lifespans than the general population. Unfortunately, cases of Marburg variant MS are usually fatal within one year, and many cases are fatal within a few weeks or months. This high death rate is caused by the intensity of the inflammatory process and the effects that Marburg variant MS has on the brain stem. The brain stem controls many basic functions of life, including breathing.

Building a Community

MyMSTeam is the social network for people with multiple sclerosis and their loved ones. On MyMSTeam, more than 170,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with multiple sclerosis.

Are you living with multiple sclerosis? What form of MS do you have? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on MyMSTeam.

All updates must be accompanied by text or a picture.
Remi A. Kessler, M.D. received her medical degree from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. Learn more about her here.
Jessica Wolpert works to empower patients through the creation of content that illuminates treatments' effects on the everyday lives of people with chronic conditions. Learn more about her here.

Related articles

Lesions form in multiple sclerosis (MS) as a result of damage to the nerve cells in the central...

Multiple Sclerosis Spine Lesions: Your Guide

Lesions form in multiple sclerosis (MS) as a result of damage to the nerve cells in the central...
The John Cunningham (JC) virus is linked to the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is...

JC Virus, PML, and Multiple Sclerosis

The John Cunningham (JC) virus is linked to the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is...
According to the latest research, the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be the leading cause of...

Does Epstein-Barr Influence the Course of MS?

According to the latest research, the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be the leading cause of...
Multiple sclerosis (MS) manifests in different patterns depending on how it first appears and...

Multiple Sclerosis Types

Multiple sclerosis (MS) manifests in different patterns depending on how it first appears and...
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system (CNS), which includes...

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) – An Overview

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system (CNS), which includes...
If you or a loved one are living with multiple sclerosis (MS), you've likely studied a lot of...

Quiz: Do You Know These Key Facts About MS?

If you or a loved one are living with multiple sclerosis (MS), you've likely studied a lot of...

Recent articles

Many symptoms can go along with an autoimmune disease like multiple sclerosis (MS). Everyone’s MS...

Can MS Affect the Skin? Dryness, Lesions, and More

Many symptoms can go along with an autoimmune disease like multiple sclerosis (MS). Everyone’s MS...
If you have multiple sclerosis (MS), you may wonder about the therapeutic potential of lion’s...

Lion’s Mane Mushroom: Is It Effective and Safe for MS Symptoms?

If you have multiple sclerosis (MS), you may wonder about the therapeutic potential of lion’s...
Some people with multiple sclerosis (MS) find that they repeatedly bite their tongue, lips, or...

Can Biting Your Tongue Be a Symptom of MS?

Some people with multiple sclerosis (MS) find that they repeatedly bite their tongue, lips, or...
People with multiple sclerosis (MS) sometimes develop comorbidities (secondary diseases). Some...

ITP and MS: Can Multiple Sclerosis Cause This Bleeding Disorder?

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) sometimes develop comorbidities (secondary diseases). Some...
Feelings of numbness and tingling are common symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Not only can...

Numbness and Tingling in MS

Feelings of numbness and tingling are common symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Not only can...
If you’re living with multiple sclerosis (MS), you may have experienced a common symptom of the...

Costochondritis vs. MS Hug: What’s the Difference?

If you’re living with multiple sclerosis (MS), you may have experienced a common symptom of the...
MyMSTeam My multiple sclerosis Team

Thank you for signing up.

close