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3 Benefits of MS Medical Alert Bracelets

Posted on December 06, 2022
Medically reviewed by
Joseph V. Campellone, M.D.
Article written by
Anastasia Climan, RDN, CDN

Medical emergencies can happen anytime, anywhere — at school or work or while traveling. Depending on where you are when an emergency occurs, the people around you might not recognize what’s happening or know what steps to take. This can be dangerous because people with multiple sclerosis (MS) may require special care in an accident or a health crisis.

An MS bracelet or another form of medical identification informs people around you about the appropriate course of action if you’re unable to speak for yourself.

How can a medical ID help? What types are available? Is wearing one right for you? Read on for important reasons why you or your loved one with MS might consider wearing an ID bracelet.

1. A Medical ID Helps Others Know What To Do

A medical ID bracelet communicates that you have MS and provides directions on what can be done during an emergency.

If you or a loved one is living with MS, you know how challenging health scares and accidents can be. A medical ID bracelet is an important safety measure for people who have MS or other serious health conditions. It not only lets others know you have MS but also informs them of other vital information, such as any medications you take and allergies you have.

Without medical identification, other people will not know if your symptoms are caused by MS or something else. Wearing a medical ID can help those around you know how to respond and prevent dangerous mistakes or interactions.

2. An ID Provides Access To Your Medical Information

A bracelet or other form of medical ID can immediately inform first responders or emergency department staff about details of your MS. Paramedics usually check for medical information on a person’s body, in a wallet or purse, and on their phones.

A survey conducted by American Medical ID found that more than 95 percent of respondents look for medical IDs during health emergencies. Medical IDs like MS bracelets provide vital health information to others.

Generally, medical IDs are customized to reflect your unique health status. They often include medical information such as:

  • Your full name
  • Your MS diagnosis
  • Your medical history and any other medical conditions (including diabetes, asthma, or severe allergies to food or medication)
  • Any medications you take
  • Your symptoms of MS, such as an altered gait, headaches, vision problems, or tremors
  • Emergency contacts, such as a parent, partner, caregiver, or close friend

When health care providers can rapidly access this information, it helps them give you the safest and most effective treatment possible. If you take maintenance medications to keep your MS symptoms under control, you can avoid missing a dose and risking other serious health consequences while receiving critical care.

3. A Medical ID Offers Peace of Mind

Obtaining a medical ID bracelet or another medical ID solution may help you feel more comfortable when you’re traveling to unfamiliar places or around others who don’t know about your condition. With a medical ID, you know that if an emergency happens, you’ll be more likely to get the appropriate care and your contacts will be notified.

If you can’t speak for yourself, it’s helpful for a first responder to understand that you may walk differently or be prone to headaches and vision problems because of your MS. Many people with MS feel they need to explain their condition to others, but that’s not always possible during an emergency. Having a medical alert ID helps reduce the worry that others won’t understand your situation.

MS can take a toll on your mental health, but products that increase independence — like medical IDs — can help improve your resilience and quality of life with MS.

Other Types of Medical IDs

A medical ID bracelet is one of the easiest, most recognized, and effective ways to communicate medical conditions in an emergency. Medical ID bracelets don’t require service, upkeep, or batteries (which can run out).

Additional options for medical IDs include watches, necklaces, ID cards, tags, pendants, and key fobs. Most medical jewelry allows you to engrave the information of your choice, and others provide slots for paper inserts. In the United States, medical IDs usually have the Star of Life symbol, representing emergency medical services. This signifies that the wearer has a medical condition that emergency services staff should note.

Depending on the style and the seller, you can get a piece of medical ID jewelry such as a silicone bracelet for a few dollars or pay $15 or more for a custom engraved metal design. You can also find free medical ID cards online to print at home.

MS jewelry is just one form of medical ID. There are many other options that might suit your needs.

Audio Recorders

Audio medical IDs are small audio recorders that clip onto your clothing. They allow you to save information in an audio file for emergency responders. You can record a message that includes details about first aid or any relevant medical information. In the event of an emergency in which you are unable to speak, first responders can quickly press play to listen to your prerecorded information.

USB Devices

A USB device can hold your medical information, including PDFs of documents, and be attached to a dog tag or wristband. With USB medical IDs, keep in mind that medical information is confidential and should be stored and accessed securely. When shopping for a USB medical ID, make sure it has an encryption feature with proper security guarantees from the manufacturer.

Medical Tattoos

Some people opt for medical ID tattoos, which provide the same identifying information as traditional medical IDs.

Talk with your doctor to determine whether it’s safe for you to get a tattoo. You should also inform your tattoo artist that you have MS.

Smartphone Apps for Medical IDs

Some smartphones have features that let people access specific types of medical information from the lock screen. This allows medical professionals to see your health information without needing a password for your phone.

If you have an iPhone, you can set up a smart medical ID by following these instructions. If you have an Android or another non-iOS phone, you may need to download an app — search for “medical ID app” on the Google Play Store or your phone manufacturer’s app store.

Near-field communication (NFC) allows smartphones and other similar devices to communicate with other technologies and transfer information — including medical information — over short distances. If you have a wristband, wallet card, or key fob that uses NFC, medical personnel can access your medical information on a secure website in case of an emergency. This information can include anything you think would be important, including care plans, prescriptions, and medical documents.

Talk With Others Who Understand

MyMSTeam is the social network for people with MS and their loved ones. On MyMSTeam, more than 194,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with multiple sclerosis.

Do you wear a medical ID bracelet or carry another form of medical alert? Has it been useful? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on your Activities page.

American Medical ID is proud to celebrate over 25 years of serving the chronic health community by offering personalized, custom-engraved medical ID jewelry. In an emergency, the jewelry allows medics or other medical professionals to give prompt, precise treatment. Leading physicians, pharmacists, educators, and hospitals endorse American Medical ID jewelry for people living with a chronic condition.

All updates must be accompanied by text or a picture.
Joseph V. Campellone, M.D. is board-certified in neurology, neuromuscular disease, and electrodiagnostic medicine. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Learn more about him here.
Anastasia Climan, RDN, CDN is a dietitian with over 10 years of experience in public health and medical writing. Learn more about her here.

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