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Caffeine and Multiple Sclerosis: 8 Things To Know

Updated on June 26, 2024

Caffeinated beverages are a morning staple for many people around the world. Most types of coffee, tea, soda, and even some supplements contain caffeine that can help jump-start the day. What are the health benefits and risks of caffeine, and do they change if you’re living with multiple sclerosis (MS)?

    Many members of MyMSTeam use caffeinated beverages to help with symptoms of MS. “Fatigue is annoying. Tired most of the time,” wrote one member. “Caffeine helps me to stay awake and focused.”

    Read on to learn about the pros and cons of caffeine for MS symptoms, what the current research shows, and when to consider curbing your caffeine habit.

    1. Caffeine May Boost Energy and Help With Fatigue

    Caffeine is a natural stimulant, meaning it speeds up communication between the body and the brain. Caffeine can make you feel more awake. It can also increase your attention span and ability to focus, make you feel more energetic, and reduce your appetite.

    For people living with MS, fighting fatigue is often a top priority. At Cleveland Clinic, fatigue is the most commonly reported MS symptom, experienced by as many as 80 percent of those with MS.

    Fatigue can be a symptom of MS itself or a medication side effect. It could also be caused by a mental health condition or another medical problem, stress, insomnia, or an unbalanced diet. Regardless of the cause, MS fatigue can seriously affect your life. It can sap your motivation, limit your job performance, and strain your relationships with family and friends.

    One questionnaire study found people with MS-related fatigue who drank coffee reported better concentration and attention spans while completing tasks. The researchers also found the participants had an easier time structuring a daily routine and felt minimal side effects from caffeine. A review of six studies on the effects of caffeine on tiredness in MS emphasized that caffeine — and specifically coffee intake — has been shown to improve fatigue. Coffee contains more than 1,000 naturally occurring chemicals and antioxidants, in addition to caffeine.

    2. Caffeine Can Worsen MS Bowel and Bladder Symptoms

    While caffeine can have several positive effects on people living with MS, excessive caffeine consumption can also have consequences. This is especially true at high doses.

    Caffeine can affect the gastrointestinal system, causing an upset stomach or cramps. Caffeine can also irritate the bladder and lead to urinating more often. Many people with MS already have symptoms of bladder or bowel dysfunction, painful belly bloating, and heartburn. Too much caffeine could make those symptoms worse.

    3. If You’re Feeling Anxious, Caffeine Probably Won’t Help

    Large doses of caffeine can cause overstimulation, sometimes leading to anxiety, panic, or a racing heartbeat. Anxiety is also a common MS symptom, and caffeine could make you feel more anxious.

    4. Caffeine Can Make It Harder To Get a Good Night’s Sleep

    More than 13,000 members of MyMSTeam report experiencing insomnia. Large amounts of caffeine, especially in the afternoons and evenings, can lead to difficulties falling asleep or staying asleep. Because fatigue is so common in MS, getting a good night’s rest is critical. Limiting your caffeine intake to the morning hours is one way to reduce the risk of interfering with sleep.

    5. Caffeine Can Help Fight Inflammation

    Several research studies in neurology suggest caffeine may have anti-inflammatory effects on the body. Because immune system inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS) causes damage and symptoms in MS, reducing inflammation is a definite benefit. A review of 15 studies seems to suggest that coffee, not caffeine in general, is responsible for the anti-inflammatory action. Some teas are known to fight inflammation too, especially green tea.

    6. Some Research Links Caffeine To Preventing MS

    Some research suggests coffee drinking may have a protective effect against developing MS in the first place. One study found that people who drank 900 milliliters of fully caffeinated coffee per day — a little less than four cups — were less likely to develop MS. A 2018 review of existing research published in Frontiers in Neurology found some studies indicating coffee and caffeine might lower the risk of MS, while others found no effect. More research is needed to see whether high doses of caffeine are neuroprotective against developing MS.

    7. Research on Caffeine and MS Disability Is Ongoing

    Some studies have looked at how caffeine consumption has an impact on MS disability. A Belgian study published in the European Journal of Neurology found that people with MS who included coffee in their diet had a slower progression of disability. However, other studies have found caffeine has no impact on the development of MS-related disabilities. For now, the jury is out on whether your morning cup of joe can help slow MS progression.

    8. Caffeine Is Best in Moderation

    Just like most things in life, moderation is key with caffeine. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) suggests adults limit caffeine to less than 400 milligrams per day (about four or five small cups of coffee). Consuming a moderate amount of caffeine, in the form of coffee, tea, or other caffeinated foods, may improve a person’s ability to focus and reduce MS fatigue without causing negative side effects. That being said, everyone is different and some people are more sensitive to caffeine. If you have other medical problems, such as anxiety, high blood pressure, or sleep problems, watching your caffeine intake can be very important.

    Speak to your health care provider before adding caffeine to your diet or changing the amount of coffee you’re consuming. It’s always smart to be aware of the ways caffeine could help or hurt you, so you can feel your best.

    Talk With Others Who Understand

    MyMSTeam is the social network for people with MS and their loved ones. On MyMSTeam, more than 213,000 members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with MS.

    Do you regularly have caffeine? Do you find it helpful for managing MS symptoms? Are you concerned about the effects of caffeine? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on your Activities page.

    References
    1. Caffeine — StatPearls
    2. Caffeine: Consumer Consumption Habits and Safety Perceptions — Food Insight
    3. Coffee — Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
    4. Is Coffee Good or Bad for Your Health? —Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
    5. What Are Stimulants? — Alcohol and Drug Foundation
    6. Caffeine and Health — JAMA
    7. Fatigue in the Context of MS — Cleveland Clinic
    8. The Effect of Coffee and Caffeine Consumption on Patients With Multiple Sclerosis-Related Fatigue — Nutrients
    9. Could Coffee and Caffeine Treat Fatigue in Patients With MS? — American Journal of Managed Care
    10. Caffeine’s Side Effects — Aurora Health Care
    11. Caffeine: How Much Is Too Much? — Mayo Clinic
    12. High Consumption of Coffee Is Associated With Decreased Multiple Sclerosis Risk; Results From Two Independent Studies — Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry
    13. Does Caffeine Affect MS? — Overcoming MS
    14. Consumption of Coffee or Caffeine and Serum Concentration of Inflammatory Markers: A Systematic Review — Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition
    15. Neurodegenerative Diseases: Can Caffeine Be a Powerful Ally To Weaken Neuroinflammation? — International Journal of Molecular Sciences
    16. Anti-Inflammatory Action of Green Tea — Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Allergy Agents in Medicinal Chemistry
    17. The Impact of Coffee and Caffeine on Multiple Sclerosis Compared to Other Neurodegenerative Diseases — Frontiers in Nutrition
    18. Alcohol, Coffee, Fish, Smoking and Disease Progression in Multiple Sclerosis — European Journal of Neurology
      Updated on June 26, 2024
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      Kathryn Shohara, MS, RDN, LDN, CNSC is a clinical dietitian for adults at Baylor Scott & White Hospitals. Learn more about her here.
      Remi A. Kessler, M.D. is affiliated with the Medical University of South Carolina and Cleveland Clinic. Learn more about her here.

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